The New Iberia Blues: one last hurrah?

This book has ‘swansong’ stamped all the way through it. The latest in a long line of literary crime novels in the Dave Robicheaux series, The New Iberia Blues reads like the author’s valedictory address. It’s an extended farewell to old Louisiana, as the landmass slowly disintegrates into the ocean and the subtle shades of…

Kings of Delusion: Katrina and the serial killer

Set in New Orleans before, during and immediately after the chaos of Hurricane Katrina, Kings of Delusion takes an already dramatic situation and boosts it into overdrive by throwing a serial killer into the lawless, semi-submerged mix. It’s an solid set-up, one which uses the real-life recollections of a paramedic as the basis for the…

Crime Czar: southern sugar

This slim detective novel is billed as being ‘hard-boiled’ but it’s far from gritty or grim. Crime Czar is more of an entertaining interlude in the life of lawyer Tubby Dubonnet, who eats and drinks his way through myriad New Orleans landmarks while balancing grief for his recently deceased partner, delight at the birth of…

The Axeman’s Jazz: not the NOLA that I know…

Writing historical crime fiction is no easy task: you have all the challenges of contemporary crime – a convincing plot and characters and a credible ending; suspense, tension, threat and so on – and you’ve also got to get those factual ducks in a row so that the time and place feel authentic and convincing.…

New Orleans Noir: not waving but drowning

The Akashic Noir series of crime anthologies always offer intelligent entertainment. Sometimes the theme, be it a city or country or a specific situation can be a little drowned out by the individual narratives. I’ve read some Akashic collections where you might not be able to identify the theme if it weren’t obviously splattered all…